What if sales transformation could become just another every-day project and not be a big managed initiative…?

Is this just a dream…? What if a CRM system automatically prompts me at the right time and guides me with a simple (not more than 2-3 lines) template, telling me what to do… I will always on top of the client journey! I will always know what to do, how to do and when to do…

on top of the client journey

Sales Transformation is more than deploying of new sales methodologies… its really about changing sales behaviour… and driving sustainable change… far bigger a challenge than most realise!

In recent client interactions, I have found many clients investing in expensive sales methodology trainings, setting up new workflows, building checks and balances… driving their teams to comply to newly deployed systems or processes…

There are many different sales methodologies in use – from the more widely known ones like Miller- Heiman’s Strategic Selling, SPIN Selling, Target Account Selling (TAS) etc., to a few that have their own niche following such as MEDDIC, The Challenger Sale (TCS, a successor to SPIN), Value Selling Framework, Solution Selling, SNAP Selling, Sandler, CustomerCentric Selling etc. All of these require the sales teams to adopt a structured approach to the sales cycle… expect them to get acquainted with complex decision matrices, question checklists and develop the capability to select from a vast suite of alternative scenarios…

Lots of investment in time, resources and processes is done by organisations (big and small), and yet the returns fail to match the expectations or the potential – and it always takes longer than projected! This is not from lack of commitment or motivation from the management, nor from selection of incomplete or ineffective methodologies – for each methodology has years of study, research and results that have led to its formulation and evolution. While, some methodologies focus on communication and messaging, others give more attention to important aspects of the sales process like discovery, qualification, decision criterion, decision process, and a few also cover account mapping, identifying champions and developing effective relationship maps.

The biggest stumbling block in effectively embedding these methodologies (or for that matter any new process or workflow) is the standard deployment approach – a few days of targeted intense workshop training (with tons of reference documentation to read and refer), followed by managed introduction of the new process, and setting up internal programs to drive adoption and compliance of the workflow through monitoring, tracking and regulating actions.

The reality is that however good the methodology and the supporting frameworks or worksheets, it is one thing to know what is required, a completely different thing to overcome inertia and an even a bigger ask to develop the capability to select from a vast range of options to put that into action. It is very natural to unintentionally fall back into the comfortable and tested mode of operation… and even the most effective of all monitoring and tracking is limited in effectiveness to simply managing and rewarding activity and very rarely get further down into quality or tangible results.

My personal experience has shown that the key to success is to try to embed the new methodologies into every day action. Do not simply rely on the quarterly, monthly or weekly reviews of plans, strategy or approach – big scary excel sheets, fancy blue sheets or other frameworks – as these are offline snapshot activities (and after all reviews!)… Instead enable every update, every action to automatically answer the questions and capture the information relevant to the stage of the client journey… Of-course this is easier said than done… but is achievable by supporting human intelligence with elements of collaborative intelligence and machine intelligence… support the user by giving him prompts – at the right time of the client journey – that guide him to the relevant questions… (Believe me – all sales users will love the fact that there is no need to remember the questions or the criterion or the complex matrices, or refer to offline reference tutorial to understand the definitions of confusing terminology or fill up documentation and worksheets!).

Remember that these prompts and questions cannot be big word documents or excel worksheets – that will turn off all of us… given our attention span 2-3 lines describing the question will work best… what if don’t even have to write down the answers and can instead capture the response as a short video? Well! We have our new template or worksheet – a short structured video! Where every question is just a segment in the video, and as the question is prompted we answer the question on video and move on to the next question… so a series of 3-4 questions gets recorded as a short structured video… just imagine the simplicity over all the documentation!

Is this doable? What does this require?

  • Take the client journey and map it to our own definitive stages – stages that we have identified for our custom workflow (say discovery, definition and scoping, qualification, positioning and validation, negotiation, closure etc.)
  • For each stage, building upon the methodology in use, list down the applicable questions and qualifiers (e.g. Is this an opportunity? Can we compete? Can we win? Is it worth winning?)
  • Map the questions into templates. [Each template is a set of 3-4 questions (2-3 lines max) which get encoded as segment descriptors for a structured video]
  • Identify triggers that mark the start or end of different stages and associate the templates with the triggers.
  • Integrate the triggers into the sales workflow (as simple service extensions on the CRM)
  • The occurrence of an event or a trigger will result in an automatic notification to the user, feeding him with the prompt and appropriate template

So, what does it deliver? As a user, I don’t need to refer to offline documentation or associations or supporting apps and toolkits, I simply engage with the defined process of updating client interactions in the CRM system. The process automatically activates on changed triggers or new events and notifies me (the user) on specific action, prompting me with the appropriate template to ensure full coverage of the questions to progress the opportunity or reduce the risk.

The notification acts as a natural check and reminder to engage with the process and the prompts drive the quality of client conversations… The methodology gets embedded as a way of working and requires no offline effort from the user. The underlying goal of building sales capability and moving the organisation towards consultative selling gets gradually into the social fabric of the organisation.

The improved effectiveness of sales and better understanding of client needs opens up new opportunities for accelerating business.

This is not just a concept today but tested in the field through SmartVideoNotesshort, structured and searchable video bites that are embedded into client CRM systems.

SmartVideoNotes (from humanLearning) are being used by global organisations today to drive sales transformation and embed new sales behaviour through use of customized client journey templates and associations. It is also being used for digital transformation to embed technology and innovation into everyday actions.

This article was published @LinkedIn on August 05, 2016.

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When products are designed to fall apart…?

DisassembleCar

A couple of days back, the home button of my iPhone stopped responding… this is the second iPhone I have owned that has ended up in this state in the last 3 years… and it got me to think…

As I started to reflect on it, I started to become more and more convinced that this is by design – a clear strategy to deliberately restrict the lifespan of a product… clearly to drive the replacement cycle.

But what intrigued me the most is that this is not a new radical approach conceived by Apple, but has been successfully deployed by product manufacturers and producers for decades.

I came across an interesting story from the 1920’s where it is said that Henry Ford started to buy back scrapped Ford cars and asked his engineering team to disassemble them. Almost everyone believed that the goal was to find the parts that had failed and identify ways of making them better. On the contrary, Henry Ford asked the team to identify the parts that were still working and explore ways of re-designing these parts to cut down their life and have them fail at the same time as the others – a smart business intent to cut down the cost of design and manufacturing and avoid over-designing!

Its an out-of-the-box way of looking at things… and seems to make perfect strategy. Introducing the product lifespan as product parameter adds flexibility to the product development cycle by opening up options for exploring other constraints – not just time, cost or quality, but also technology selection, material properties, user experience, performance, processes, regulations etc.

I got so fascinated with the idea that I continued to look further and found a term planned obsolescence, that has indeed been used in the context of product design and economics… it talks of the approach that attempts to design a product with an artificially limited useful life such that it becomes obsolete or no longer functional after a certain period of time, where the driver is primarily to reduce the repeat purchase time interval i.e. shorten the replacement cycle. It appears that the light bulb was an early target for planned obsolescence when the companies standardised the life of a light bulb to 1000 hours and even went to the extent of fining producers if the light bulbs lasted longer! The strategy has found support from governments in the past and it has been used to stimulate consumption and fuel economy… but over the years it has resulted in divided camps, and in recent times there have been movements against this strategy with some countries now requiring manufacturers to declare the intended product lifespans.

As I thought about it further, it dawned on me that I was practically guilty of following the same strategy… and hence had lost the moral right to be judgemental … I realised that it can easily be argued that we (software providers) are no different and have enforced users to upgrade to new products by stopping support for older technologies, using incompatible interfaces, restricting hardware or OS support and building vendor lock-in… the intellectual production has fallen prey to the same pattern (as industrial and consumer production) of generating constant (renewed) demand for their products… creating a society that lives under the illusion of perpetually new.

In this state of mixed emotions, my view got biased by my own experience and actions… while many people argue that this belief that products are designed to fall apart is a fallacy, I have (albeit reluctantly) to disagree.

My experience of product design and development has taught me that every product design cycle involves a complex interplay between many business, technology and operational factors – from time-to-market, price points and product positioning to technology readiness, user experience, performance or resources, processes etc… and it is a reality that I have designed products with a clear view of a restricted life-span – simply using them as first generation products for early adoption and then replacing them (over time) with new product releases… which is an example in itself of designing products to fall apart (after a time)… or maybe it begins to sound more reasonable when we rephrase it and say that products are designed to work successfully for the defined lifespan and specified business goals…

Of-course, the answer is not what I wanted to hear as it means that I have to start looking for a new phone – even when I did not have the need for any new functionality… but then maybe I do not know what I am missing and may be pleasantly surprised by the ‘new’ product…

Arti is the co-founder of humanLearning (www.humanlearning.com) – a fast growing UK-based technology startup – setup with an earnest desire to make the life of busy professionals simpler and more effective. hL is disrupting business workflows thru WinSight – a mobile-video based platform – that is changing the way businesses drive innovation and quality in sales and service. Arti can be reached at arti@humanlearning.com.

[This article was first published on @LinkedIn on April 16, 2016]